Manhattan: Mapping the Story of an Island

From History Book By Book
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Prehistory
ManhattanStoryIsland.jpg

Manhattan: Mapping the Story of an Island
Author: Thermes, Jennifer
Buy at Amazon | BookShop.org

Time Period: various
Time Frame: 10,000BCE-2018 Unable to interpret the "10,000BCE" input value as valid date or time component with "There is no year 0 in Gregorian and Julian calendars." being reported.
Geographic Area: North America
Country: United States
Topics: New York City
Genre: Non Fiction
Reading Age: Middle Grade
Format: Picture Book
Published: 2019


American History

Told in dazzling maps and informative sidebars, Manhattan explores the 400+ year history of Manhattan Island.

From before its earliest settlement to the vibrant metropolis that exists today, the island of Manhattan has always been a place of struggle, growth, and radical transformation. Humans, history, and natural events have shaped this tiny sliver of land for more than 400 years. In Manhattan, travel back in time to discover how a small rodent began an era of rapid change for the island. Learn about immigration, the slave trade, and the people who built New York City. See how a street plan projected the city’s future, and how epic fires and storms led to major feats of engineering above and below ground. Through dramatic illustrations, informative sidebars, and detailed maps inspired by historic archives, Manhattan explores the rich history that still draws people from all around the world to the island’s shores today. From The Battery downtown up to Inwood, every inch of the island has a story to tell.

Emily's Review

I love books like this - so much history and fascinating tidbits in a beautifully illustrated book. Covering a huge swath of time - prehistory through modern day, there is a ton of information covered. This is the kind of book you could read through numerous times with your child and catch something new on each reading.

My only complaint, and the reason why I am only giving it 4 stars rather than 5, is that the author, for whatever reason, completely leaves out 9/11. There is an illustration of the World Trade Center towers that includes the dates it was built and destroyed, but no other information was given. I feel like that was a pretty significant moment in Manhattan history to completely leave out, particularly when other difficult topics like slavery were mentioned.

While it is a picture book, I think this is best for a slightly older audience, but it's engaging enough to work through slowly with a younger child.

Other Similar Books

Other suggestions on the subject of the New York City